Wednesday, May 31, 2006

Snip snip snip - from a new editor blog to interviewing 101

Yesterday was great. I had some spare time to do with as I choose. I chose to roam around the blogosphere and visit blogs I haven't visited in a while due to lack of time. And it is unfortunate that this is so, but at least yesterday made up for this. Here are my travels:

First I discovered a new editor blog - Evil Editor. Right now the editor has two main types of posts. One is a usual Q&A, the other is Face-Lift where he shows original and revised versions of query letters. Most interesting. If you go the April archives there are posts about agents, synopses, queries etc.

Then, I found myself nearly on the floor by Paperback Writer. She wrote about LagTime but explained it in the form of prose. Hilarious. Here's a little example:
"No, dear." John shook his head in such a way that required a paragraph of hair movement description.

And you know what they say, what goes up must come down and that's exactly what John Baker's article on How To Sell Your Book did to my mood. In the article John explains the insides of recommended book lists. Apparently there is a lot of money involved.
To have your book '‘chosen'’ as Waterstone'’s book of the week, the publisher will have paid £10,000 for the privilege.

A very good piece from Writing Fiction about Dialogue and Detail caught my eye after that.

Interviewing 101 from A Newbie's Guide to Publishing was also interesting and I thought it could teach a thing or two both the interviewee and the interviewer.

Finally, I settled on a subject dear and close to my heart - The Literary Value of Science Fiction. This one got me into angry mode again. So many sci-fi writers have proved themselves recently and overtime with regards to their literary merits, why is this still going on? Why is sci-fi still regarded as second rate?
Vonnegut pointed out that, when he went to teach at Smith college (I wonder if Andrea Hairston met him) as a creative writing prof, he did not find himself in the library stacks. If Vonnegut is as ubiquitous as dirt, that must be a snub.

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7 comments:

redchurch said...

Melly said:

"This one got me into angry mode again. So many sci-fi writers have proved themselves recently and overtime with regards to their literary merits, why is this still going on? Why is sci-fi still regarded as second rate?"

For the same reason Dan Brown is regarded as 2nd rate. Because... there are a lot of snobs. I think we were arguing about this just yesterday. ;)

There is an elite that defines artistic integrity. And then there is the underclass. I'm not sure exactly what the difference is. I do know it has absolutely nothing to do with the storytelling!

Flood said...

Man, this is funny: "No, dear." John shook his head in such a way that required a paragraph of hair movement description.

Still laughing. I read somewhere recently about the author's use of 'maybe' and 'seemed to' or anything with confusion could be taken as the author actually speaking to his writing.

For instance: "The bewilderment of the our hero as he attempts to navigate the rocky face of the cliff made him insecure." Translation? "I have no frigging idea what I am writing about right now."

Melly said...

You dare put Brown and Vonnegut in the same category, Eric? ;)

Flood, it seems to me that maybe I was too bewildered by your comment...
LOL! You're good :)

rdl said...

wow, this should keep me busy for a little while. You've been very prolific lately, thanks. :D

Melly said...

I know, havn't I?
I'm in a bit of a downtime, so I have time for this! Yay!

redchurch said...

MelQuote:

"You dare put Brown and Vonnegut in the same category, Eric? ;)"

No, wasn't referring to anyone specific in comparison to Brown.

People have lots of silly reasons for separating entire classes of fiction from one another--reasons you'll be hard pressed to get them to admit.

To me a story is a story, and its either told well or it isn't. I'm not about to sort one fiction from another by what the university professors or critics think--certainly not by which author makes a more sophisticated name-drop.

I just think there's a whole lot of psuedo-intellectual snobbery going on when it comes to fiction. Isn't that what you were getting at?

Melly said...

Yes Eric.
I guess that as a reader of many genres as well as literary I don't dare knock down things I haven't read. THese so called critics won't even try sci-fi or what not.